Shows

Chocolate Milk by Mo Pepin Opens on Friday, November 15!

Opening Reception Friday, November 15 from 6-8 pm

On view in the front window of the City Reliquary Museum through January 2020

The City Reliquary Museum proudly presents a new window exhibit, Chocolate Milk! A photo documentary series by Mo Pepin, this display follows the extraordinary perseverance of a small carton of chocolate milk on the top of a phone booth on 1st Avenue and 21st Street.

Mo first spotted the carton on March 8, 2017 on her commute and kept an eye on it in the following weeks, watching it expand in the heat and then slowly shrink. Four months later, the carton remained untouched on the phone booth, and from this point Mo kept a closer eye on this marvel, photographing it about once a month. Through snow, rain, 45-mph winds, and other vagaries of the NYC streets, the chocolate milk carton remained atop the phone booth for 405 days, through April 2018.

Chocolate Milk is a story of endurance and decay, emblematic of the persistence necessary to survive in the city on a day-to-day basis and also of the lapses in our infrastructure that feed growing inequality. It is an example of an everyday object becoming iconic, an ephemeral item gaining unexpected permanence. We are the chocolate milk carton, yet we also call for the elimination of the conditions that allow the chocolate milk cartons to exist.

The City Reliquary Proudly Presents: P.S. NYC: Artifacts from New York City Public Schools 1850-1970

As students and teachers return to their classrooms this fall, they follow a 215-year-old tradition of free public schools in New York City. Marty Raskin, lifelong New Yorker, proud alumnus of New York City’s public school system, and retired schoolteacher, has spent decades amassing a collection of NYC Board of Education materials reflecting a significant period of this history, now on view at the City Reliquary Museum. 

Mr. Raskin’s interest in collecting NYC public school memorabilia stems from his own fondly-remembered student experience. Attending P.S. 202 in East New York, he recalls, was deeply formative: “The teachers, principals, and youngsters I grew up with made school an essential part of my life, and helped make me who I am. There was an incredible loving, caring atmosphere there. I became friends with some of my teachers and remained friends with them my entire life.” Mr. Raskin began by collecting Parker Duofold fountain pens of the style used by one of his instructors, and his collection grew from there to include school records, class photos, clothing, building fixtures, furniture, and teaching equipment. A dunce chair, used in the 1850s when pupils were taught in one large schoolroom, and a mechanical eraser cleaner, used in the now-bygone days of chalkboards, are two highlights of the collection on display.

This exhibition illustrates the lived experience of generations of NYC public school students: their fashions, tokens of school spirit, classroom decorations and attendance records. It inevitably invites comparison to the visitor’s own school experience, whether in New York City or abroad. Mr. Raskin’s positive schooling experience inspired a devotion to preserving the history of NYC public education. In prompting visitors to reflect on the similarities and differences with their own education, the exhibition asks them also to consider how to provide to all students the supportive atmosphere experienced by Mr. Raskin, and what those students might achieve as a result.

Mr. Raskin gladly accepts donations of NYC public school memorabilia. He can be reached at memorabuti@gmail.com.

Empire Skate Opening Reception: May 19th

The City Reliquary Proudly Presents: 
Empire Skate: The Birthplace of Roller Disco
On view May 10, 2018 through October 14, 2018

Opening Reception: May 19th, 6 PM. RSVP on Facebook!

Admission: $5 general ; Free for City Reliquary Members

This new exhibit brings the world of Empire Roller Skating Center to life, exploring its role as a national icon and a focal point of the African American community in Brooklyn. Artifacts, archival materials, video, and first hand interviews come together to share the stories of the people who skated at Empire during the 70s and 80s, revealing the true origins of a world-wide cultural phenomenon.

Beverages generously sponsored by Brooklyn Brewery.

July 27: Healix Collective presents “Alice Walker: Beauty in Truth”

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Healix Collective returns to our backyard on Thursday, July 27th for ALICE WALKER: BEAUTY IN TRUTH, the second installment in their summer screening series. There will be a special reading by NYC poet Camonghne Felix before the film.

Alice Walker: Beauty In Truth is a feature documentary film which tells the compelling story of an extraordinary woman’s journey from her birth in a paper-thin shack in cotton fields of Putnam County, Georgia to her recognition as a key writer of the 20th Century.

Alice Walker made history as the first black woman to win the Pulitzer Prize for fiction for her groundbreaking novel, The Color Purple, which has been transformed from a novel, to a Hollywood movie and latterly to a successful Broadway musical. This universal story of triumph against all odds is not that different from Walker’s own story.

Alice Walker: Beauty In Truth offers audiences a penetrating look at the life and art of an artist, a self-confessed renegade and human rights activist. In 2010, Yoko Ono honored Walker with the LennonOno Peace Award, for her ongoing humanitarian work.

Doors @  7, film starts at sundown
$5 – $10 suggested donation | All proceeds support The City Reliquary
Beverages available by suggested donation, with beer from Brooklyn Brewery. 

Visit www.healixcollective.com for more!

The Invention of Christmas in New York: Images from Alex Palmer’s “The Santa Claus Man”

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The Invention of Christmas in New York: Images from The Santa Claus Man
On view Dec. 5, 2015 – Jan. 3, 2016

This display in the front room of The City Reliquary features vintage holiday images from Alex Palmer’s The Santa Claus Man. Described as Miracle on 34th Street meets The Wolf of Wall Street, Palmer’s true-crime adventure reveals the secret history of children’s letters to Santa. Before the charismatic John Duval Gluck, Jr. came along, letters from New York City children to Santa Claus were destroyed, often unopened, by the U.S. Post Office Department. Gluck saw an opportunity and created the Santa Claus Association. The effort delighted the public — until Gotham’s crusading charity commissioner discovered some dark secrets in Santa’s workshop.

Alex Palmer is the great-grandnephew of John Duval Gluck, Jr. and has written for Slate, Vulture, Smithsonian Magazine, and New York Daily News, among other outlets. He is the author of Weird-o-Pedia and Literary Miscellany.

Coffee: November 3. 2005

The City Reliquary Museum presents:
WCRM, The Citizens

Live: October 6. 2005

The City Reliquary Museum presents:
WCRM, The Citizens

Brooklyn Barbecue: July 7. 2005

The City Reliquary Museum presents:
WCRM, The Citizens

Gardening: June 2. 2005

The City Reliquary Museum presents:
WCRM, The Citizens